Photojojo Original

Digital Picassos — Use Digital Cameras to Create Modern Day Cubism

digital piccasoAs with many groundbreaking artistic techniques, the validity of art created with digital tools has been controversial.

But Sarah Schneider and Jake Hurwitz’s Digital Picassos are a revolution we can all get behind. Their simple method makes this truly the common man’s cubism.

Step 1: Find a couple digital cameras. (Ideally with large screens.)

Step 2: Hold each camera closely over a crucial part of your face as if you’re going to take a picture of it.

Step 3: Get a friend to take a picture of you. Rearrange and re-shoot as necessary to make yourself look as ugly as possible.

Check out the site to see more examples of the technique and submit your own!

Digital Picassos (Thanks for the tip, Nick!)

(The bug-zappers have been on full blast at The New Photojojo Forum. If you haven’t hopped aboard already, now’s the time.)

Spinning: Delightfully Joyous Photos via “Humans Reaching High Levels of Orbital Angular Momentum”

spinning-feature.jpgYou’re twirling. The warm sun is falling on your face, the soft grass is under your bare feet and an ecstatic child is beaming at you. That’s the sort of moment that makes us love summer.

No such a memory? Fear not! With a willing small human and a helpful friend, you can make your very own magic moment! (And a stunning photo record to boot.)

Step One
Position your friend behind you and the child in front, with your friend holding the camera above your arms and pointing it down toward the child. Select a slow-ish shutter speed of 1/15th sec to blur the background.

Step Two
Altogether now: spin!

Step Three
Once our giddy little subject is aloft, advise your friend to start snapping.

Step Four
Review your photos, and repeat as necessary. (We’d wait for your head to stop spinning first.)

Take it further…
Check out the Spinners and Saints group for more topsy-turvy fun. And have a little more fun with your shot with a Photojojo Photo Block kit.

Thanks to reader Linda LaSut for the tip! Photo Credit: Philipe Tarbouriech

p.s. Be the first to try the new Photojojo Super Awesome Photo Forum! Got questions about what camera to buy? Want critique for a photo you took recently? Got a great idea for a photo project you want to share? Our new forum is getting ready for its big debut, and we’re looking for some friendly beta testers. Jump on board and be the first to give it a try!

4 Easy Steps to Making Old-Fashioned Lenticular Images from Your Photos

A lenticular is an image that appears differently depending on how you look at it. If you’ve ever seen a postcard or movie poster that changes when you look at it from the left vs. the right, you’ve seen a lenticular.

Lenticulars usually require a special plastic sheet consisting of many tiny convex lenses, but you can make a super simple one with just two photos and some paper.

They make great, unique gifts, and it’s a cool way to show off more than one photo (especially related ones) in a single frame.

And it’s as simple as slicing, printing, folding and enjoying! Read our tutorial to learn how to do it!

p.s. Help spread the word: Digg this tutorial!


“Note to Future Self, Please Take a Picture of Me”: Create Your Own Ongoing Time Capsule

Photobooth time capsuleAs Doc Brown and Hiro Nakamura will tell you, sending a message to yourself in the the past is a tricky matter.

Fortunately, sending a message to a future you is far less error-prone, and requires neither flux capacitor nor fantastic genetic mutation.

Our friend Raul recently opened an envelope he sent himself 21 years ago, with instructions to add a photobooth self-portrait to the one contained within it. The similarities two decades later are striking.

Inspired by his example, we’ve compiled a short list of ideas for creating your own ongoing photo time capsule — an easy, fun photo project you can do anytime.

p.s. Yo, we’re on Facebook. Climb aboard the new Friends of Photojojo group!

p.p.s. Anyone know of a reliable way (non e-mail) to send a letter or package to yourself years in the future? Please email!


Make a Flash Photo Flipbook in Just 15 Minutes!

Back in March, we told you about George Lange’s 2006 photo flipbook. Ever since, you’ve been emailing, calling, and using messenger pigeons with little notes attached to their tiny little ankles to ask us how you can create your own Lange-style flipbook.

Ok, already. We’re gonna show you how.

To keep things simple, we’ll use a free and easy web application called JumpCut that works on any computer. Before you know it, you’ll be stringing together photos and music to make a beautiful photo slideshow of your very own.

Read our tutorial to learn how!

p.s. Today’s the last day to order photo goodies for you mama in time for Mother’s Day. There, we said it.


A Dose of Fresh Portrait Perspective

We’ve seen more than our share of portraits taken at arm’s length, in the mirror, and those showing only an eye and its corresponding brow.

But we fell in love with this four-part polaroid portrait by Melissa Brown.

Here in NYC, the weather gods will treat us to a balmy weekend in the mid-70s. If you’re similarly blessed (heck, even if you’re not) we implore you: stow your mittens and mufflers, grab your camera, and set out into the great outdoors in search of adventure.

When you do, we hope Melissa’s summery portrait inspires you to look around you with a fresh pair of eyes.

Take note of the vibrant colors and the change in sunlight this time of year, explore new angles, take photographic risks, experiment, and above all, have fun. You’ve been waiting all winter for this.

Melissa’s Portrait on Flickr

p.s. Watch out, Melissa!

p.p.s. Our spiffy DIY Photo Block Kit is now available at Elsewares, a great store featuring work by independent artists and designers. Check it out!

Monsterpod sale — just a couple days left! Our favorite stick-to-anything, gravity-defying Monsterpod tripods, $35 $29 this week only!

(Bonus: Add any other photo goodies and still pay just $5 shipping for US orders!)

Turn an Etch-a-Sketch into a Kitschy Picture Frame in Just a Few Minutes

With just two dials and some aluminum powder, George Vlosich III creates works of art with Ohio Art’s classic baby boom toy, the Etch A Sketch.

For those of us, however, who can only manage a really nice set of stairs, we have a solution.

Our Etch A Sketch Picture Frame tutorial will show you how to turn an ordinary Etch A Sketch into a kitschy picture frame in no time flat. We’ll even show you how to transform your photos so they’ll look like you spent hours twiddling those white knobs to scratch ’em out.

Read on to learn how!

p.s. A reminder: We’re looking for awesome photo submissions for an upcoming photo notebook tutorial. Submit your photos to our Flickr group!

Gravity-defying tripods on sale! It’s our birthday this month, so we’ve lowered the price on our stick-to-anything Monsterpod tripods.  $35 $29 this week only!

(Bonus: Add any other photo goodies and pay no xtra shipping for US orders!)


5 Great Photo Projects for Parties — Use Your Camera To Make New Friends

It’s party time (excellent!), but you know hardly anyone on the guest list. What’s a would-be wallflower to do?

Why, bring your camera and a few props, of course!

Pack some of our great photo projects and you’ll have your party-animal pals posing for mugshots, jumping for joy — even leaping in the tub — in no time.

Just don’t forget to get a few shots of yourself with all your new friends.

p.s. New on Photojojo Uncut: A spiffy ghost cameras shirt from Oddica, and a Swiss museum that will put your photo on its wall for real!


How to Make Video Panoramas from Your Digital Camera’s Video Clips

We call ’em Videoramas.

Panoramic photographs are great at taking in entire landscapes, urban and natural. They allow you to see beyond what your camera can capture in one frame (or in the case of panographies, many many many frames).

But why stop with stills? Your digital camera probably shoots video clips as well, and by stitching those clips together, you can make a full-motion video panorama. Landscapes, streetscapes, interior shots, birthday parties, they all come to life in sparkling, wide-angle videoramas. If you liked our panographies, you’ll love our videoramas.

Read on to see an example and learn how it’s done.

p.s. Haaappy Birthday, Photojojo! We turned 1 yesterday. :D Help us celebrate by blogging about us or telling a friend about your favorite photo newsletter. It would make our day!


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Create a Photo Time Capsule Today — No Digging Required

Remember that awesome time capsule you and your brother/sister/best friend made when you were kids? A box full of tattered Archies, tapes of Casey Kasem’s Top 40, ticket stubs to The Goonies…

Bet you wish you knew where you’d buried that thing.

Digging around the backyard isn’t the only way to get a blast from the past. Here’s a quick photo time capsule project inspired by an old camera our pal Adam found a couple years ago.

STEP 1: Buy a cheap disposable camera.

STEP 2: Take your disposable camera everywhere you go for a week, or on a vacation. Take pictures of all your friends. Fill it up with photos.

STEP 3: Write your name, address, phone, email, today’s date, and the words “Photo Time Capsule! Develop me in a few years” on the camera. Sock it in a drawer.

STEP 4: Let time pass. Move in and out of relationships, jobs, apartments. Find happiness and live life fully.

STEP 5: Rediscover camera in some dusty box, bookshelf, or corner. Develop it.

STEP 6: Admire the odd stains and scratches on the photos you get back. Marvel at what your sepia-toned life was once like. Sigh, smile.

Adam notes: I like to think that disposable cameras are like wine. The longer you wait to develop them (or drink them) the better they are.

We couldn’t agree more.

Adam Varga’s Lost Kayaking Trip Photos