Weird Archives - Page 2 of 3 - Photojojo

Get Glitchy with Your Phone’s Panorama Function


Glitching is the digital equivalent of throwing a roll of film into water and seeing what happens.

While you might not want to dip your phone in H2O, you can get experimental with your phone photos other ways.

And by other ways, we mean panorama glitching.

All you need is a sweep of the arm to get your panorama to stitch a scene in really strange and awesome ways.

(We used iOS 6’s built-in panorama, but you can try this with pretty much any auto-stitching pano app.)

1) Stitch totally different parts of a scene

  • Sweep your phone to capture one part
  • Stop, then quickly move your phone to another part of the scene
  • And sweep again

The result ends up looking like a diptic with sweet transitions that vary from wavy edges to smooth stitching or black edges.

2) Make a jagged composition of a single subject by jerking your hand as you shoot the pano. This makes for a choppy, mosaic-like image.

Try other experiments like twisting your phone as you shoot. More examples at the link below!

BONUS: Another trick to try is getting your model to show up multiple times.

Make Panorama Phoneography Experiments

p.s. Show us your panoramas! Post it to our Facebook wall, and tomorrow (4/9) we’ll pick 4 favorites to feature on our Facebook page.

How to Turn Your Phone Into a DIY Photo Projector for $1


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Slide projectors are great but outdated. And digital projectors cost a bundle. What’s a photographer to do when they’re looking for a bigger picture?

We’ll show you how to turn your phone into a photo projector for just $1.

Yep, for a buck you can have Instagram on overdrive and Flickr living large.

The project is so easy, you might even have time to sneak in a cat video or two.

Make a DIY Projector for $1
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10 DIY Photo Filters on the Cheap


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Back before Snapseed and Instagram, photographers used lens filters to add snazzy effects to their snapshots.

But filters can cost you a pretty penny, and you’re quite happy keeping your pennies, thankyouverymuch.

Well, we’ve got you covered because we’ve rounded up 10 DIY photo filters that won’t cost you.

In fact, most of these things are probably just lying around the house!

So follow along with our roundup as we accentuate the analogue and re-imagine the digital.

10 DIY Photo Filters to Try!

p.s. Our pals at Mosaic make some seriously beautiful photobooks you can create right from your iPhone! Take a look-see here.

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How to Make Glowing Photo Spheres


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Sometimes, it’s just too cold to be outside!

But that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy scenic views from the comfort of your living room (and warm blankets and fireplace).

Learn how to turn your photos into glowing photo spheres!

You’ve seen those plain paper lanterns at the store, and now you can convert them to show off your own bright and colorful photographs.

And when the temperature starts to warm up, you can take your photo spheres out on the porch. Your neighbors will appreciate the view.

Why it’s cool:

ingred-sm It doesn’t take much to transform ordinary paper lanterns into pieces that will make your room shine.

These photo spheres look great in the daylight, and even better at night!

You can bask in the glow of your very own photos. What could be better?

Ingredients:

paint-sm

  • Photos to print
  • Printer
  • 11×17 copy paper
  • 12″ Paper Lantern
  • Gel Medium
  • Sponge Brush
  • Tape
  • Xacto knife
  • Cutting Surface
  • Sphere template (optional)

STEP 1: Size It Up

paint-smMeasure the surface you want to cover and determine how big you need to print your images.

We printed four 11×17’s to wrap around our 12″ diameter lantern.

We found a good price on lanterns at World Market, but you can find them at Target, Michael’s, and a variety of online vendors. The bulb kit is usually sold separately, so make sure to pick that up as well.

Step 2: Print It Out:

paint-sm After sizing your images in Photoshop or another editing program, print them out.

We printed on regular copy paper. We found it to be easier to wrap around the sphere.

Photo paper will work, too. You might need a little extra glue. Keep in mind the thickness of the paper will affect the translucency of the sphere when lit. Photo paper will give off a more subdued light.

Step 3: Cut It Up

paint-smYou’ll need to make vertical slits on your photo in order to get it onto the sphere. Here are your two options.

You can use the sphere template to cut an elliptical pattern. Size this template to fit your photos. Use photoshop to crop it to 11″x17″ before you print. This method will keep the overlapping paper parts to a minimum.

TIP: Make sure the length of your template covers the entire sphere before cutting. You also want to make sure not to cut all the way through. You want your center “equator” to stay in tact, and use the strips to be able to bend around the thinner parts of the sphere.
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The other option is to cut straight lines vertically along your photo, again leaving the center in tact. This is the easier version, but will have more overlap at the top and bottom.

These overlapping sections are apparent in the final product, but can also produce cool effects.

Step 4: Stick it Down

paint-smStart by taping down the “equator” of your first section to hold it in place.

Coat the backside of the image with gel medium and press into place. Gel medium is a glue like paste available at any art supply store. It’s a lot like modge podge, but has a nice clean finish when it dries.

Tuck the corners over the inside edge of the lantern. You may want a little extra gel/glue here to secure them.

Step 5: Do it Again

paint-sm Repeat the previous step for each section of the photo.

Overlap each strip slightly to create a continuous image. Tuck the edges, and keep going.

TIP: Work in sections vertically across your lantern, i.e. glue the top of the first strip, then the bottom of that same strip, before moving on to the next section.

Step 6: Seal it Up:

paint-sm This step is optional, but can help give your lantern a nice, finished look.

After each section is in place, brush a thin layer of gel medium over the photo, sealing in any cracks and smoothing out areas on your sphere.

TIP: You can use your hand on the inside of the lantern to press out any parts that may have been crinkled in the process.

Step 7: Dry it out:

paint-sm Let it dry completely before hanging it.

Depending on how much gel medium was used, this can take from one hour to several hours.

Step 8: Hang it up!

paint-sm Follow the instructions that came with your lantern for connecting the bulb and socket.

Pick your favorite place and hang up your glowing photo creation.

Enjoy your photos in all of their glory!

Why Stop There?

  • Make a string of these beauties using paper lantern Christmas lights.
  • Make glowing portraits. Put a face on one orb, torso on another, legs and feet on a third.
  • Try printing photos on transparencies to make other worldly glowing orbs.

Make an Easy DIY Wall Clock from Photos


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Let’s be honest: you’re only excited to look at a clock when you’re waiting for it signal the end of a long day. And those clocks usually aren’t much to look at.

This DIY will make you happy to see what time it is, at any time of the day. Make a clock that uses your fabulous framed photos for each hour.

It’s an easy project that we think you’ll have a fantastic time with.

Digital clocks will be wishing they were analog!

Make A Clock Using Photo Frames

p.s. Our pals at Lensbaby make this *amazing* lens called The Muse. You can squeeze and bend it to move around your photo’s sweet spot of focus!

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How to Make Cinemagraphs — Still Photos that Move Like Movies!


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Yup, that picture moves.

Nope, you’re not going crazy!

‘Cause who said photos can only feature “still” life?

Inspired by the moving pictures created by photographer and motion designer duo Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg, we set out to make the magic happen.

Make your pictures move like ours did with a some Photoshop magic!

Make DIY Moving Photos!

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Photo Science: How 5 Photo Techniques Work & How You Can Play With Them!


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Ever wonder how your camera works?

…If instant photos are actually made of something other than magic?

We sure as heck do!

In fact, we think the science of photography is half of the reason that being a photographer is so freakin’ cool.

While photography usually feels like magic, it’s actually very scientific and mathematical. (We even know the ISO of the human eye!)

We’re going to show you some of our favorite basic photography techniques, what makes them tick, and how you can try them all yourself for a hands-on view of how all your favorite photo stuff works!

5 Ways to Play with Photo Science

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Top 20 Ultimate Ways to Use a Disposable Camera




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When it comes to photography, we like to root for the little guy.

He’s the picture taker that works hard, is easy going and is always around when you need him.

Yep, we’re talking about one of our old favorites: the disposable camera.

While we love adding filters to our phone pics and making masterpieces with our DSLRs, there’s something magical about disposable cameras we can’t forget…

They’re cheap, fun to play with and can do almost anything!

Here’s our top 20 list of didn’t-know-you-could-do-that ways to use, abuse, modify, and make the most of your disposable camera!

Top 20 Creative Ways to Use a Disposable Camera
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Glow-in-the-Dark Photograms: Turn Your Photos into Spooky Glow-in-the-Dark Wonders


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All Hallow’s Eve: it’s the holiday that summons our creative jojo powers from the beyond.

There’s something about the crafty sea serpent costumes and elaborate dino pumpkin sculptures that really gets our inner DIY-er pumped.

That’s why we’re harnessing our Halloween-infused excitement into a truly awesome photo project that our pal Ken Setzer taught us: glow-in-the-dark photograms!

This mystifying project will transform your very own photos into spooky glow-in-the-dark wonders and will even get you back into the dark room…if you dare!

Mua ha ha. Ha.

How to Turn Your Photos into Spooky Glow-in-the-Dark Images!

p.s. Got an idea for an awesome new Photojojo Store goodie? We’d love to hear it, anytime! Just contact us *here*.
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How To Make Instagrams, Hand-made Exposures on Instant Film!


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Did you know that history’s first photographic images were made without a camera?

It’s true!

Way back in the 1830s, William Fox Talbot discovered he could place objects on photo-sensitive paper to make images called “photograms.”

We’re going to show you how to make them with instant film, so we call ’em “instagrams!” (We also call them “awesome!”)

How To Use Your Instant Camera to Make Instagrams!

p.s. On Friday we sold out of our new Camera Lens Mugs faster than you could say espresso. But more are on the way, so order now for a mid-August delivery!

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