Photospanning: For Photos So Big They Burst Out of Their Frame


Some things are just too colossal to fit in one photo: Easter Island heads. An extended family reunion. Conan’s pompadour.

Don’t give in to the tyranny of the frame! Bust your subjects out of their borders with a technique we call “photospanning.”

Photospans cross multiple frames: the Easter Island chin in one shot, the face in another, and a third shot of the brow sitting on top.

With just a little planning-ahead, they’re easy to make (and: easy to simulate).

After all, your photos have always been big! It’s just the picture frames that got small.

The Photojojo Guide to Photospanning

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Freelensing! Turn any Lens into a Tilt-Shift or Macro


A great philosopher once told us, “first, you must first learn to focus without focusing.” Or maybe it was our optometrist. Whatever. It’s deep.

That transcendental magic is at the heart of Freelensing, a photographic process that begins with the removal of your lens.

Freelensers simply hold unattached lenses in front their camera’s exposed sensor, and delicately tilt it until focus emerges.

Hand-manipulating a lens will reinvent your focal plane, producing amazing macro and tilt-shift effects that were previously only possible with special glass.

And more importantly, it will reinvent your concept of the universe. Or at least, tilt it slightly.

Photojojo’s Complete Guide to Freelensing

p.s. We’re going to JAPAN in search of amazing photo goodies for the Store! Where should we go? What should we see? Do share!

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The SLR Sloop Camera Bag

feature-sloopExtra photos for bloggers: 1, 2, 3

We looked everywhere for a camera bag that could carry everything (really, ehv-re-thang). But the ones that could were dreary, drab, and very un-cool.

So heck, we made our own. Say hello to The SLR Sloop. A camera bag with room for your SLR, lenses, flash, keys, wallet … and most importantly, room for your style.

The SLR Sloop Camera Bag 
Twitter It!
$149.00 at the Photojojo Shop!

Shape Your Photos into a Cat, Dog, Boyfriend, Vampire, or Anything Else!


Scott Adams, creator of Dilbert, once observed that computers are like a pointy-haired boss: incapable of organizing anything without human help.

But ShapeCollage bucks that trend, automagically jostling your photos into instant-collages that match whatever shape you desire.

The possibilities are endless: lay your photos on an olde-tymey background or even your own face, construct a map, make a cherry tree out of cherry trees, assemble by color, hide a familiar face amidst the art, or our favorite, assemble a dashing vest.

Of course, now that you’re actually expecting it to organize things, your computer may deserve a bouquet on Administrative Professionals’ Day. Up to you.

Photo-Shapes in Moments with ShapeCollage

p.s. We’re going to JAPAN in search of amazing photo goodies for the Store! Where should we go? What should we see? Do share!

p.p.s. Thx for the tip, Sairam! See something we need to know about? Tell us!

Snapsort Finds the Best Camera for You


There’s tons of camera-comparers out there, but newcomer Snapsort introduces a new element: jousting! Statistically, that is.

The site lets you saddle up any two cameras, point them at each other, and stand back as they knock each other off of their steeds (statistically) by comparing stats like screens, video, weight, and memory.

Just tell the omniscient index which cameras you’re interested in, and it’ll identify a victor with bold statements like “has 35% more zoom” or “takes higher resolution photos by 18%.”

This combination of Renaissance Faire and photo stats sets our nerdy hearts aflutter. Now, have at you, Sir Nikon!

Use Snapsort to Find the Best Camera for You


p.s. Some comparisons we liked: the Canon XSi vs T1i; Nikon S630 vs Pentax P80; and Casio EX-G1 vs Panasonic DMC-ZR1.
p.p.s. Our PJ Shop peeps are headed to Tokyo in search of awesome photo stuffs! Do you speak the language? Have valuable advice? Do share, most knowledgeable one!

Bring Lost Cameras Home with a Digital Summoning Spell


Oh no, you just lost your camera! (Not really, but let’s pretend.)

But never fear: writer Andrew McDonald employs a clever trick to call home his wayward cameras.

In the event that he accidentally leaves it behind, Andrew created special picture-messages specifically to be found by anyone snooping through his camera’s memory.

Discovering a delicious mélange of jokes and guilt trips (and bribery) will prod all but the most heartless to hand your camera back over to you.

How to Summon Home a Misplaced Camera

p.s. For more inspiration, browse Andrew McDonald’s pictorial guide!
p.p.s. Thanks to reader Jay for the tip! Drop us a line anytime, y’all.

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Turn a Disposable Camera in to a Reusable Flash Slave

newflashimage

Become a one-person gaggle of flash-bulbing paparazzi by transforming disposable cameras into a flash slaves that obey your digital camera’s every command.

Surrounding yourself with an army of strobing minions requires a bit of tinkering, but who’s afraid of a little electrical tape and a microchip or two? “Not I!” said the brave photographer. (That’s you.)

Buying a flash is way too easy — fashioning a Frankenflash in your secret underground lair, now that takes true photographic gumption.

DIY Disposable Camera Flash Slave

Photo Philosophy to Brighten Your Brainy Bits


Award-winning photojournaist James Pomerantz is studying for an MFA in Photography, and now you can read the books that he’s reading.

His list is dense and scholarly (what’s this, no excerpts from the Photojojo book? Haaaaaarumph) but your gray matter (and your photographic output) will thank you for peeking over James’ shoulder.

For example, Barthes’ “Rhetoric of the Image” ponders:

“if the image is in a certain manner the limit of meaning, it permits the consideration of a veritable ontology of the process of signification. How does meaning get into the image? Where does it end? And if it ends, what is there beyond?”

That noise your hear are your dendrites cheering.

Twenty-Six Thought-Provoking Essays on Photography
(Our fave: Michel Foucalts’s “Of Other Spaces: Heterotopias.”)

Photo Credit: Ed Yourdon

The Best Roundups of the Best Photos of 2009


Ready to throw yourself in a heap across the finish line of yet another decade?

Say goodbye to the Nads and hello to the Tweens with our roundup-roundup: the best photos of 2009 as chosen by experts at Time, National Geographic, Billboard, and more.

Of course, it’s fun to reminisce about Twitpics of planes on the Hudson, or to imagine that there could have been life before Glee.

But it’s even more fun to imagine the photo-ops that await us in the new year.

Your mission: Say a proper goodbye to 2009, and go make two-thousand-and-awesome the best photo year yet!

The Best Roundups of the Best Photos of 2009

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Add an SLR Lens to your Cameraphone


Coaxing together some duct tape, cardboard, and a disassembled laser, lens-hacker Bhautik Joshi presided over the marriage of a big fat SLR lens and an iPhone.

Despite looking a bit like a hippo riding a skateboard, the “Phone-O-Scope” yields an attractive mix of low-fi digital grain and classy SLR-style depth of field.

Even better: it’ll work on any cameraphone.

Next up: attaching a telephone booth to a point-and-shoot.

How to Attach an SLR Lens to Your Cameraphone

p.s. Today’s Photojojo brought to you by our pals at Animoto. We loved their automatic, pro-quality animated slideshows two years ago. They’ve come a long way.